The Wildlife Center at Crosstimbers Ranch
 The Wildlife Center
at Crosstimbers Ranch
 A 501(c)3 non-profit organization
 


The Wildlife Center at Crosstimbers Ranch facility is not open to the public. Unlike zoos, our goal is to release these animals back to the wild. The animals in our care are negatively impacted by excessive human interaction. It is for this reason that our facility is open by apointment only. Thank you for your understanding and assistance in returning these animals back to the wild where they belong.


Like us on Facebook

Please support our cause by making your tax deductable Donation Today!

They need us, we need you.

Source: crosstimberswildlife.org
Author: jeremiah
06/02/2014

Everybody needs money to secure their food, water, and shelter. The basic necessities. Luckily for us humans we can choose to get up in the morning, or afternoon, and go to work. Unfortunately the animals we care for here at the ranch, who also need these things, are unable to pull in an income and depend upon us to take care of that for them. In fact, not only do they not go to work, they play all day! This is where you come in to the picture.

Working with these animals is beyond a full time job. As you can imagine feeding and watering wild bobcats can be a bit of a challenge, not to mention bedding changes ect. Where does this food come from? water? shelter? bedding? It comes from you. We provide the labor and some of the supplies, however we depend upon your help to provide the rest.

The main purpose of this article is to place emphasis on bare necessities. If you've got a little extra after your necesities are taken care of, why not give a little to help these cats get their's with maybe a little extra. Take a pass on that fast food meal? 8 bucks. That bag of chips? 5 bucks. Don't think you have to give big if you give, every little bit counts and is appreciated by these animals that are counting on you. Make a custom donation for amounts under $10 on our donation page. If you want to go crazy you can do that too.

Corporations, need a tax break through charitable donations? Yes, there are other more prominent and visible charities out there but we are local to the Dallas/Fort worth area. Why not help the one that relocates the wildlife in your own back yard. Fellow corporate citizen we would like to extend a hand and welcome your corporate sponsorship to help us hold the line between urban sprawl and the great outdoors as best as we can. The more sponsors we can get, the better we can help avoid unnecessary animal casualties and offer more temporary housing pending relocation.

Whether you give big, or give small, it's appreciated by us and the animals under our care.

http://crosstimberswildlife.org/help_wccr_help_the_animals

 


Wildlife Rehabilitation dates back to the beginning of civilization. Human kind, by nature, seems to have a devout need to nurture.

Beginning in the late 1970's, there was a movement in this country toward standardizing rehabilitation practices and techniques. Each time there was a progression, a law changed, and rehabbers had to re-learn the way things "should" be done. With these changes in constant flux, both rehabilitators and agencies began to develop their own definitive standards and philosophies.

Many rehabilitators withdrew and began working as independents. A few started small centers dedicated to helping injured and orphaned animals. Agencies moved forward using scientific based research to improve habitat and stabilize populations support by government monies dedicated to keeping our wild populations healthy.

Sadly, there was no government support for the individual animal, so any animal injured, orphaned or otherwise in need of help had to find it's way to a wildlife rehabilitator who would care for it out of their own pocket. Thus two very distinct and important ideas developed about wildlife and our place in it's world.

The first developed through public wildlife agencies and their philosophy that the survival of the species overrode the value of the individual animal within that species. The second idea is the philosophy, obviously held by rehabilitators, that "every life matters", and that each animal deserved to be treated with care and dignity.

For many years, these two philosophies have been in conflict and although neither philosophy is incorrect, for years they have been considered mutually exclusive.

It has made it difficult for rehabbers and state and government agencies to work together for the preservation of wildlife. It has only been within the past ten years that these two schools of thought have begun to come together, realizing that the survival of a single animal supports the survival of the species, and understanding that as rehabilitators we can not save every individual animal that comes into our care.

The rehabilitators are beginning to understand the intricacies of the ecosystem, the importance of balance, and the impact of their actions, and agencies are beginning to embrace the idea that working with those rehabilitators aids the larger cause of promoting increased awareness of wildlife issues.

It is this movement that has inspired the development of WCCR. We believe that if we all start on a level field, it will be easier for us to work together and respect each other's positions and responsibilities.

Professionalism on both sides is essential, and until now, there has not been a program that state agencies could stand behind. We strive to be the bridge between two professions, creating a stronger, more professional working environment for both.



Volunteer today and become a part of something really big!



Do you dream of working with wildlife? Do you love a challenge? Would you like to learn about the secret world of wild animals? Join us today at the nation's first flagship school for wildlife rehabilitation! Learn everything you need to know to sucessfully work with these amazing animals. Please click on the WREN project page tab for more information and class registration!



getwild@crosstimberswildlife.org

Who we are

The Wildlife Center at Crosstimbers Ranch was founded in Terrell, Tx early in 2008. At that time, our director had a vision. A vision that did not include a working wildlife rehabilitation center for at least another three years!


Through the WREN project, the plan was to create the most cutting edge, comprehensive wildlife rehabilitation and habitat conservation education center in the state of Texas, and then the United States. In the three short years we have been in existence, we have achieved that goal. Although the WREN project has achieved national recongnition, it is currently only available in the state of Texas.


The next goal is to make this project available in all 50 states. To make this possible we will need substantial endowments and corporate sponsorships. The exponential numbers of lives that could be saved through the expansion of this project are innumerable!


As soon as the doors were open, the calls for help began pouring in, and our director realized the immense need for a working rehabilitation center in the region. So, we began taking in wildlife, expecting only a few hundred animals. That year, almost 1,000 animals came through the doors of WCCR! The following year, more than 3,500! Our third year brought in over 4,000!


We continue to take in astronomical numbers of wildife in need. Because of our immense growth in such a short time, WCCR never had the opportunity to solidify staffing or funding for a facility of this size. Therefore, this 501(c)3 currently remains volunteer run, and owner funded. We can no longer sustain our rate of growth and are currently seeking corporate sponsorships and investors to continue operations in the state of Texas.


kari@crosstimberswildlife.org

Links and other information

Check out the official Crosstimbers Blog! Get updates on the goings on at the ranch!


Join our Cause!


Check us out on facebook! Activity updates and lots of pictures!


Found an animal? Need help?

email us at getwild@crosstimberswildlife.org


or visit



Need help with a bobcat?


visit our sister site


National Bobcat Rescue and Research Foundation